Aloe Ferox

© Chris Daly
Cultivated aloes farmed near Albertinia, Western Cape Province.

The Healing Succulent

The versatile aloe is known for being the healing succulent. Its fleshy leaves hold nourishing properties that facilitate the healing and improvement of many ailments, most commonly skin-related. The aloe genus - Xanthorrhoeaceae, contains more than one species, in fact, there are over 500 aloe species worldwide, the better known ones being: aloe vera and aloe ferox. Aloe vera is also referred to as the ‘true aloe’, while aloe ferox is known as the ‘bitter aloe’.

In this segment, we will be learning more about the bitter aloe. Considered as one of the tallest among the aloe species, the single stemmed aloe ferox plant can reach up to 3 metres in height

Aloe Ferox Production

The aloe ferox production process is something to behold. In this segment, the making of what is arguably the most useful all-purpose product will be followed in easy steps....more

Aloe Ferox: The African Aloe Vera

Africa has over 360 species of the genus Aloe linneus of which the Aloe ferox is the most used and commercially produced in South Africa. Aloe ferox is different from aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis)....more

Benefits of Aloe Ferox

The benefits of aloe ferox are well-known throughout South Africa. Its long history of medicinal use is a testimony to the healing impact it has had on those who have used the products, that originated from this eye-catching, yet unassuming succulent....more

Harvesting Aloe Ferox

Harvesting aloe ferox is a complex process that requires skill and diligence to successfully complete. The reaping process usually begins from June until August in order to secure the aloe plant for the following season’s harvesting process....more

Home of the Aloe

A small town found on the panoramic Garden Route of the Western Cape bears the title: ‘Home of the Aloe’, its common name being that of as Albertinia....more

Parts of Aloe Ferox

The advantageous properties of the aloe ferox plant is well documented. Its historical use began with the native inhabitants of the Western Cape, in South Africa....more